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Morning Joe

News/Business. Interviews with newsmakers and politicians; host Joe Scarborough. New.

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03:01:00

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mpeg2video

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1080

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Washington 21, Marco Rubio 21, Chris Christie 20, Us 19, America 19, Barack Obama 19, Angie 16, Tsa 16, Filner 14, United States 13, San Diego 10, Mika 10, U.s. 9, Snowden 9, Mike 8, Mike Barnicle 8, Obama 8, Texas 8, Afghanistan 8, Christie 7,
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  MSNBC    Morning Joe    News/Business. Interviews with newsmakers  
   and politicians; host Joe Scarborough. New.  

    August 1, 2013
    3:00 - 6:01am PDT  

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weiner and spitzer have a chat. and morgan miller said ann colter and chris matthews. >> and i got this one, say miikka and you think? we'll find out from mika coming up. "morning joe" starts right now. >> i want to understand. >> why? >> why were they playing batman? >> i love that show. have you -- did you see batman when growing up? >> i did. >> i like catwoman. >> the daily news this morning. >> no. >> this is shocking. >> good morning. >> no. >> no. >> men being preyed upon. men being preyed upon again. simon cowell apparently gets his best friend's wife pregnant and he is stunned. >> he thought it was being friends with benefits. >> until he's the one tricked.
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>> thursday, august 1st. it's august 1st. >> no! >> i'm not a big fan of august. >> how are you doing, thomas? >> i need to go on vacation. >> it's august 1st. >> august, man. >> you've been working too hard. >> i have. >> you know, you ought to go to nantucket. >> there are a lot of poor kids out there in the fields, bartlet farms. >> text me. >> you're in big trouble. >> catwoman is mad at you. >> what's going on today. >> we have contributor mike barnicle, he's here. >> he's great. >> former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst steve ratner. >> yeah. >> thomas roberts. >> yeah. he is batman. >> and in washington, former governor of vermont and former chairman of the democratic national committee howard dean. >> having too much fun already. >> nice tie. it's cute. >> is that. >> save the children. >> good. that's great. a lot to cover this morning. rand paul, sort of reaches out,
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olive branched chris christie. >> does he take it? does he take the olive branch? >> he doesn't. he has sort of a response that i think, well, we'll see. i'll let you decide what you think it is. more fast food workers plan strikes today in their fight for higher wages. and we have the story out in san diego which continues to get more unbelievable. >> this bob filner story. >> unbelievable. >> sexual harassment against -- >> it gets stranger. everybody but the san diego chicken is claiming that he had his hands all over them. and filner's lawyers blaming the city for not training filner about sexual harassment. what's at the top of the news. >> we begin with a new report on the tsa. the agency tasked with keeping weapons and explosives off planes and passengers safe that could cause concern, big concern for air travelers, as nbc news justice correspondent pete
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williams explains the report accuses everything from sleeping on the job to letting friends and baggage through, other workers accused of stealing from passengers. take a look. >> never saw that coming. >> reporter: an airport screener caught on surveillance video running carry-ons through a metal detector without stopping to review each image, suspended 30 days. another airport a screener walks away to help a family member at the ticket counter and then takes the family carry-on and bypasses screening, suspended seven days. and the gao told congress half the screeners who fall asleep on the job, receive less than even the minimum level of discipline called for by tsa's own policies. >> rather than punishing the employees using standard penalties tsa chose to go easy on those who find it hard to stay awake while protecting the american people. >> reporter: misconduct cases at tsa went up 27% over the past three years, about 9600 in all,
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most were failing to show up as scheduled, violating security rules or sleeping on duty. >> of the 9600 cases, about half resulted in letters of reprimand, 31% resulted in suspensions and 17% resulted in employees removalal from tsa. >> reporter: tsa insists it is tough on the worst offenders, firing 380 employees over the past decade for theft, for example. including a screener at the orlando airport who admitted stealing four laptop computers from passenger baggage. >> if we can prove an individual is stealing, if we can prove that an individual is taking drugs, if we can prove that an individual is intentionally subjugating the security system and can prove it immediately they're out the door. >> reporter: says the tsa, without definitive proof employees get letters of reprimand while complaints are investigated. still the agency says in a workforce of more than 56,000, most of them professional, bad things are bound to happen. >> we're going to have people
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that sometimes do stupid things. >> what's the problem here? i mean, is the problem -- i mean, the pay is very low, right? >> the pay is very low. >> if you're working at washington reagan national and you're working tsa screeners and you decide to quit and go over across the hall to work at the dunkin' donuts you probably are getting a pay raise, aren't you? >> i'm not sure it goes that far. these are entry-level jobs and they attract people with entry-level skills. >> attracted by working at dunkin' donuts, those munchins, we've seen the monotony, but also real professionals but also man, some -- they need to get more professionals in there, pay more money. >> really? >> if it's about protecting the skies, protect the skies. >> i'm going to protest with the fast food workers. >> they have to appropriate more money and we're back to congress. >> unlike other companies like big fast food companies that make good profits, but just don't pay people well because they don't want to.
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>> that's just not true. >> it appears, mika, the time-tested beer summit invitation is not going to smooth over -- >> yeah. >> a recent rift. rand paul wants to get together, he wants to put it all behind them. i don't think chris christie wants to. >> when he does this olive branch it sounds so concocted. the rift highlighting some of the friction within the republican party over the national security and spending. now the u.s. senator from kentucky is looking to put differences aside but it doesn't appear to be on the top of chris christie's list. >> we're going to have to patch things up. if we can sit down, i'm inviting him for a beer any time he would like to come down and sit down at the pub around the corner from the senate, we'll formalize it and put it in writing, but i think we could sit down and have a beer and mend things and probably -- at times people have said, chris christie has some libertarian leanings, it's a little ironic we see him
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criticizing libertarians in the party. the offer to have a beer with chris christie stands. if he wants to break bread and see if we can find common ground i think it will help the party to not have us feuding. >> he suggested maybe the two of you sit down and have a beer and bury the hatchet. >> i'm running for re-election in new jersey. i don't really have time for that at the moment. you know, if i find myself down in washington, i'll certainly look him up. but i don't suspect i'll be there any time soon. i've got work to do here. >> i mean -- >> christie said he's not surprised by the attacks from senator paul saying, quote, he's not the first politician who's used me to get attention in the national media. >> i love it. >> and he sure won't be last. also, the lack of a clear leader within the gop, a pew research poll is showing 34% of republicans don't know who lead their party. you know that number actually is about 70% lower than it should be. >> there's also -- >> actually 104% of republicans
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have no idea. >> stop. >> who is leading their party. >> howard likes that. >> another 22% say nobody does. a split over the directionion of the gop. 54% of voters in the party want it to become more conservative. 40% would prefer a more moderate path. and mika, this politico story this morning is talking about how the most important people in the republican party as far as getting them ready for the next election, the donors that support, i mean there's still a hangover from 2012 and a lot of the crazy, radical, type of people that were in the primary. >> exactly. what he just said. politico pointing out that liberal groups are beating republicans so far this year in the money race. when it comes to trying to win back control of the house, a leading democratic super pac has raised $3 million in the first six months of 2013. compare that to groups working to elect republican candidates.
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they raised only about $1 million combined. >> yeah. and howard, there again, republicans are not completely out in the cold here. nate silver suggesting they may win back the u.s. senate. of course he works sports so i don't know -- >> right. >> pay attention to that. but anyway, it's certainly not a loss for the republican party. they could be in good shape, but this is party -- a party clearly in search of itself. >> yeah. it's fascinating to watch this. first of all, lesson number one, for rand paul, who is, by the way, not a libertarian. if you believe you ought to be able to tell women what to do with their reproductive rights you are not a libertarian. lesson number one for rand paul, do not take on a guy from jersey. obviously this guy does not watch hbo, and, you know, you're not going to win a fight like this with chris christie. that's not the way it's going to happen. secondly, the real problem is,
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at the grass roots of the republican party is at odds with what the policymakers understand has to happen. they are way out there. this stuff going on in north carolina and texas, this anti-women's stuff and all this, that is not the way to advertise. this is a national story. the national races are going to get tainted by what's going on in texas and north carolina in terms of the anti-abortion, anti-union, anti-everything. i think the republicans have trouble. they really do. they don't -- the sort of the cooler heads don't seem to have the vision or the willingness to prevail, and if they don't prevail, i do not think nate silver is going to be right. nate silver is usually right, but i think it's going to be tough. >> well, and -- and nate silver is usually right. people in new york think as long as he's predicting democrats are going to win. >> all right. let me just say that gayle collins writes in "the new york times" politics of a screeching halt. she writes in part this, one of the least attractive legacies of
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barack obama will be the way he empowered freshman senators to believe they were only one or two good speeches away from the presidency. right now the show horses of the united states senate are rand paul of kentucky, ted cruz of texas, and marco rubio of florida. all preparing for a 2016 presidential bid. all making visits to iowa. they're the new faces of the republican party. really, really new. the three of them have an average age of 45 and an average tenure in washington of 1.9 years. that's not necessarily a bad thing. >> no. it's awful. >> paul and cruz in particular tend to drive other republican senators nuts. asked by the new republic whether he would support rand paul or hillary clinton for president, mccain laughed and said, it's going to be a tough choice. actually, it wouldn't. if rand paul got nominated for president, mccain would be the honorary national chairman of republicans for hillary. >> you know, this is one of the
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things that, mike, has driven me crazy about republicans that have been talking about marco rubio from the day he got sworn in. marco rubio. the same republicans saying barack obama didn't have enough experience to be president of the united states, but actually caught fire and became a historic character in part because he's an african-american and that's what republicans go around scowling about, now they're doing that to one of their own, marco rubio, because he's hispanic. it is so clear watching marco rubio fumble through one situation after another, that he's not ready. if barack obama had been a much better president if he had actually waited a couple years? hell yeah. is marco rubio, is -- i mean rand paul or any of these guys, no. it's not a knock on them personally. they just got there.
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>> marco rubio is an interesting case. he should really take a look at the last three months of 2011 and the first three months of 2012 and the romney campaign, because the further that mitt romney walked to the right in the primaries, he realized he couldn't get back and marco rubio can't get back now. he's gone so far right on some issues, and he's so confused on a couple other issues but the most interesting aspect of the republican party, at least i find it the most interesting aspect, part of it occurred here yesterday, steve. tom cole was on, congressman cole was on, followed by senator saxby chambliss and they both indicated somewhat of a willingness to listen to president obama's proposals the other day about the economy, about corporate taxes and everything like that. the division within the republican party is really, really interesting. >> no question. i agree with everything joe said about people who have been in congress for an hour and a half and deciding they're going to run for president.
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i think there is one distinction between these guys and president obama, which is particularly ted cruz and rand paul are way out there on the fringe of ideologically of their own party, let alone america. obama, call him a liberal or what you want but he was not on the fringe. he was down the plate of the democratic party. you have guys who are both not ready and also taking really wacko bird positions to -- >> at the same time, a lot of that has to do with the fact where you live and what your views are. there are a lot of people in middle america that don't see ted cruz or rand paul or marco rubio out of the mainstream. a lot of people. as many people don't think they are, as people don't think barack obama is. i mean barack obama -- >> they're not even in the mainstream of the republican party. barack obama was in the mainstream of the democratic party. he may have been inexperienced. >> when these guys came in 2010 they are in the mainstream of the republican party.
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look at the fact that in 2010 it's not like there were a couple people that snuck. >> office. republicans won the largest legislative landslide on the state and national level i think probably in the 20 -- in a century. it was a remarkable victory for them. the problem that some of them don't understand is, that in american politics, you know, life rolls on really, really quickly. so i just -- i want to push back and say, and drain ideology from this argument on them in part because i'm the only republican in this zip code, but also because barack obama won, because in part because he was against the iraq war and that was a very big ideological driver for him and hillary clinton wasn't. >> joe, be you bring up a really interesting point, and that is -- >> i like --
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>> character. what nobody has talked about or you alluded to, rubio, for example, is hanging himself not because he's getting so far out, because he's vacillating. voters can't stand people who vacillate all over the place. he comes out with an immigration program, the right pushes him and he's backing away from it. that's the attraction of chris christie. it's not just that theiry're wa out there and rand paul wants to get rid of the fed, which would have sunk the economy, chris christie knows who he is and he's not afraid of getting out and saying so. in washington, people dance around a lot when the pressure gets on and people don't want that in a president. i think christie will be a formidable influence. he will have a hard time getting the nomination because he's more moderate than republicans are who vote in the primary. he practices conviction politics. >> and thomas, he's exactly right. howard is right. marco rubio's biggest problem is, he's vacillating, saying one
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thing when he's, you know, speaking spanish, saying another thing when he's speaking to, you know, english-speaking stations, and whoever is guiding him, needs to be fired right now. >> what do you think if chris christie had gotten an invitation from the senator saying, i would like to come to jersey and have a beer with you on the jersey shore this summer, about to have a break in august. do you think chris christie would have taken him up on that. >> he wouldn't have done that because the whole thing is stupid. >> yeah. i don't think so. >> you talk about -- >> these are washington games and chris christie just doesn't play them. >> you talk about these guys just getting there or being there for an hour, i'm not sure that matters. are they distinguished characters? >> it does matter. it matters, mika, because barack obama almost six years in, and i'm going to get tweets the rest of the day. >> right. >> the guy, six years in, still doesn't know how to run the office. why doesn't he know how to run the office? for the same reason that you wouldn't want me running the
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chemistry lab, you know, at princeton. because i didn't do it. he doesn't know -- >> being a great leader is going into that fish bowl of idiots that nobody likes. >> mika, actually knowing how things work. understanding the calls to make. look how lyndon johnson did it, how fdr did it, you look how ronald reagan did it, you look how leaders did it. mika, barack obama, i know this is -- shatters everything you've ever -- >> i'm not talking about president obama. i'm talking about rand paul and ted cruz. >> it's the same thing. >> are they distinguished characters. >> it's the same thing. >> are they leaders. >> it's the same exact thing. barack obama was only in for about two minutes before he decided he was bored with the senate and wanted to be president. he came in, ill equipped to be the leader of washington, d.c. rand paul, if he ran for president won, would be ill equipped. marco rubio, ill equipped. stay there for more than a few
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minutes. it's -- mike, six years in, who wrote the op-ed today? ron forn knee yeah asked the question this morning. >> about leadership. >> about leadership. what if barack obama -- this is nothing personal against barack obama. i'm not going to let you fix my car if you don't -- and i'm in the middle of the desert if you don't have experience fixing cars. >> everything has changed so much over the last 10 or 15 years in terms of leadership in washington. it used to be there was fear of the presidency. in terms of, you know, you're with me or else -- we're not going to get any roads or anything built in your state. that fear is gone because they have a different constituency in the senate and house. they can go on twitter, they can go on cable tv in their home districts. their own megaphones to counteract even the presidency. i agree with ron's piece, by the way, that there has been a striking lack of leadership from the president of the united states, especially in dealing with the house and the senate, especially dealing with legislation, potential
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legislation. tremendous lack of leadership. >> and you know what -- >> strong -- >> and maybe i'm saying this as a creature of the house, i know how things work. anybody that goes -- that's there understands, you don't get on the floor and you don't scream like, you know, like rand paul is and -- not rand paul, but that ted cruz. you quietly go talk to the other side and say this is what i want to do. what do you need? you go back and forth. have your big speech on the floor but while you're doing that you're working on three different levels. i don't have to explain this to you. you do deals every day. >> can i say two quick things. i take your point about experience. i would also, though, however like to make my point once more that i think the ideology of these guys -- >> you're saying that because you're a liberal. >> let me finish my sentence. the ideology of these guys will warm the hearts of every democrat if this becomes the ideology of the republican party of the next election. this would be moving the republican party or keeping it, whatever verb you like, out there somewhere.
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second thing about leadership before you jump down my throat -- >> i would never do that since i love you like a brother. >> i look at you like an uncle. >> i like some of your cash. go ahead. >> he loves financiers. >> i've forgotten my point. >> right here. >> distracted you with love, steve. >> was your point the fact it's so different because substantial -- >> my point -- >> show love. this is how it would work. >> you can criticize barack obama's leadership all day, that's fine, i get that. you show me the leadership at the house. >> because that's deflecting. >> that john boehner was trying to get through on appropriations couldn't keep his people together, bill goes down. >> talking about the president of the united states. >> why? >> you know what i would have no problem with any of these three guys deciding if they wanted a leadership position in the senate that's one thing. being president of the united states, it requires you do things that you did in vermont before you started to run for president of the united states.
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>> that's not washington. >> that's the big difference between washington and being a governor in either -- being a governor, you actually, until recently, couldn't move way out of the needle. now you got guys in north carolina who don't have any spine because they're afraid of the tea party and the guy in wisconsin is a real right winger, so i guess that's -- that's usually not the case. most governors realize the solutions are in the middle, no not on the fringes. i do think that, you know, when you have -- when you're in the chair, you have to make a decision, stand up and make the decision. that's not what people in the senate have to do. >> when he said the guy in wisconsin -- i'm sure he was talking about some union leader because i can tell you scott walker he's right in the heart of america. >> yeah, yeah, yeah. all i can say, joe, the idea of you running a chemistry lab at princeton terrifies me. too late to sell my house in vermont because it's too close to princeton? >> it should terrify you all these people think, as gayle collins said this morning, because barack obama as a fluke of history became president of
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the united states, now everybody thinks they can get sworn into the senate and start running for president. >> stop it right now. this is -- you keep making this about the president. >> it's governors that make a better president? >> of course they do. >> who is prepared to -- literally who is more prepared? chris christie or rand paul or ted cruz? >> some governors make a better -- >> you want governors that can complete sentences and remember their middle name. >> how do you lead when trying to lead people, a certain percentage will never accept the fact that he's president. they won't. >> you know what, i hear this all the time. we will see when we get a strong leader back in the white house, how they do it. democrat or republican. we'll see if it's hillary clinton or chris christie or whoever it is, i always go back to george w. bush -- >> in washington -- >> george w. bush had nancy pelosi as speaker of the house in 2007 and 2008, go back and look at what george w. bush did. when 80% of americans and probably 95% of people in the house were against the surge in iraq, you know what george bush
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said, we're going to do a surge in iraq. guess what? he got it through. he pushed it through. >> he had a relationship. >> he brow beat them. >> he talked to her. >> they talked to them, but they also pushed it through. it's not easy. >> you think that was his relationships or cheneys? >> i think cheney said things to members of the united states senate that did not -- >> alex is mad. >> coming up on "morning joe" -- >> what did he say to leahy? go -- yourself. i love that guy. i am not a shamed to say i love dick cheney. >> whoa. >> does that jar you too? >> excuse me? >> listen, you're jarred by all of these great americans i love. let me tell you something -- >> oh, my god. i just want to get to a break. >> do what you want to do. i will not sit here while you tear down the united states of america. j gentlemen have you seen "animal house". >> i love it.
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when he says i'm rush chairman. glad to meet you. >> it's so great. >> the one i'm a really big deal. >> republican senator tom coburn joins and former labor secretary robert reich, alex wagner, and khalid hosseineny and the latest issue of bloomberg business week asks this question, can marissa mayer save yahoo!? >> haven't we been asking this question for a while? >> we didn't have information. now he's been in the job -- she's been in the job. the aecnswer ahead. up next, mike allen has the top stories in the politico playbook. first bill karins. >> guy couldn't save his dog. >> with a check on the forecast. bill. >> joe you said you loved three people today and never once said it to me. >> i love you. >> that's not good. >> i won't blush as much as ratner did. i'll blush a little bit.
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>> in the south, bless your heart. >> rain is heading into the northeast today. not a great beach day. it's going to be one of those days kind of cloudy, humid and see on and off rain. raining in philadelphia. not the kind of stuff that will cause travel delays or airport delays but you will see maybe a little bit of slow downs on i-95 during the day today. thunderstorms also possible. so keep the umbrella handy. heaviest rains to new york to hartford to boston later today. this morning down towards philly, baltimore and d.c. also, we're starting to head into the peak season of the hurricane season. climatology the peak is september 10th. start to go up the cliff here. the next three months is the big period. we have yet to have a hurricane. they predicted as many as 11. the atlantic basin as quiet as could be. good news. every day we get by in august without a hurricane is a good day. as far as the rest of the forecast across the country still hot in texas. still kind of chilly in the great lakes. enjoy what should be a very nice thursday. you're watching "morning joe"
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♪ i win! what's in your wallet? . hey, let's take a look at the morning papers. >> 30 past the hour. our parade of papers, star ledger, the owner of eight tgi fridays restaurants in new jersey will pay a fine of $500,000 for serving cheap liquor to customers who thought they were drinking top shelf brands. the discovery, part of an investigation called "operation swill" found that 29 new jersey bars were actually refilling expensive liquor bottles with cheaper products. >> the "dallas morning news," george zimmerman acquitted of murder charges in the death of trayvon martin was pulled over
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for speeding. he told the officer he had a pistol in the glove box of his trunk. when the officer asked where he was going, zimmerman said, quote, nowhere in particular. >> "washington post," landslide vote the house approved a bipartisan bill to reduce student loan rates. the senate approved bill links interest rates to financial markets but rates will be capped at 8.25%. earlier this year, rates jumped from 3.4% to 6.8% after congress failed to reach a compromise. >> and "the new york times" for the first time in seven years, the atf finally has a permanent director. the senate confirmed president obama's nominee, byron todd jones by a vote of 53-42. the vote lasted five hours, nearly a new senate record. he serveds as acting director of the atf since 2011. >> okay. los angeles times with this
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story, according to bob filner's lawyer, the city of san diego may be held libel for not training filner about sexual harassment. the democrat ace attorney says the city is obligated to provide employees on guidance on what sorts of behavior is unacceptable and he said the city never did that for filner. the attorney admits a lack of training doesn't excuse inappropriate behavior. i'm going to say like, for example, like stroking someone's cheek. >> yeah. >> and asking them if they have a man in their life is probably inappropriate. i'm thinking. but maybe some people need to go to school for that. >> can i tell you, when mike barnicle first did that to me five years ago. >> yeah. >> i said, mike, you know, i do have a man in my life and if you could just keep -- >> mike, that was wrong. >> keep -- >> had you had training. >> it's not your fault. >> i wanted this safe it space. >> you never gave me the manual.
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>> you didn't have the classes. >> just like filner. >> shouldn't parents teach you that. >> help me, san diego. >> keep it classy. >> keep it classy, san diego. >> mlb is prepared to ban a-rod for life. >> oh. >> know who is happiest about this, yankee fans. they want him to go away. >> all right. >> let's go right now to chief white house correspondent for politico mike allen here with the morning playbook. mike, the president was facing some resistance from house democrats yesterday over his possible pick for the fed chairman during yesterday's meeting. of course we had a lot of congressmen not wanting larry summers to be the next fed chairman and, in fact, one congressman, walked to the microphone and said larry summers, bad choice. president obama reportedly told the session not to believe everything they read on-line and said he was being made out to be a, quote, progressive whipping
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boy and added summers was the rock of gill bra tar to try to work through the policies and turn the economy around and i'm not going to stand idly by and let his name disparaged and reputation trashed because people have a political agenda about who should or should not be the chairman of the federal reserve. mike, sounds like the president is standing by his man and sounds like he may have met -- >> it does. i have people telling me he should name his fed chairman. let this go all through august as they plan to do, they won't announce it until september is going to cause trouble if he does what he wants to do. it's ever clear, day by day, the president wants to name larry summers. when he's defending larry summers he's defending himself. he picked larry summers as his economic adviser in that treacherous time and what he's
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pushing back against, one of the liberal backlash, is a theological difference on economics. people who on the left who don't want a continuation of the ruben school which is what you get with larry summers. you have this amazing human drama. very important, the most interesting line from the president's closed-door meetings on the hill yesterday, he threw out a third name. he took the pressure off himself a little bit and mentioned a third possibility, don kohn, the vice chairman, the job that janet yellen, the other contender now is in, during the bush administration, bush nominee. he's providing a little backcle do -- back door for himself. another interesting twist yesterday during the senate democratic conference, the president went to both of them, the door opened and during the senate democratic conference, someone poked their head in and it was senator john mccain. >> how interesting. >> made a cameo, joked he opened
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the wrong door. >> mika, little disappointed when mike allen said he opened the door to a third possible fed pick, i thought he would say me. how far down in the depth chart do you have to go before you get to young joey scarborough. why is it progressives don't trust larry summers? >> i like larry summers and he's very bright. he was associated with the -- actually with the early policies, the clinton policies, which laid the groundwork. it was mostly the bush policies that got us to the collapse of 2008. huge tax cuts, no offsetting cuts -- >> no. you had it right the first time. larry summers and bill clinton put a lot of things in place that led to the problems. >> it was bob rubin and bill clinton. larry was part of that. i think getting rid of glass steagall turned out to be an enormous mistake, one they have not owned up to i might add.
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i can understand the problems here. i think this is not usually -- this is not just progressive whining. this is a serious debate that needs to take place because i think we have been misled by the more wall street-oriented policies that the democratic party has espoused. >> like steve ratner, a man part of this whole to ruin america, to destroy it, tear it to shreds and rip it up. if i get my hands on that steve ratner, if i ever see him again -- oh, hey, steve. how are you? >> i'm fine. but what howard just said, however of course i think needs correction. >> can we have a split screen here. there's nothing more sexy than when democrats fight. >> steve, make your point. >> can we have a beer summit to fix this out. >> this is a turn on for joe watching two democrats fight. >> the fact is there was an enormous failure of regulation that led to the financial and
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economic crisis. no one will doubt that. the repeal of glass steagall had nothing to do with it. look at the institutions that failed, fannie mae, freddie mac, none were banks and regulated by glass steagall. >> citi corp failed, bank of america. >> citi corporate got in trouble later. >> even the things -- >> they were too -- >> even the think that got citi corp and bank of america in trouble would have been legal activities before 1999. >> except getting rid of glass steagall they became too big to fail. >> i don't think that's true but we can have that debate separately. at least acknowledge my point it was not the proximate cause of the financial crisis. >> it wasn't the only cause. >> i'll tell you what, man, i got to defog my glasses watches liberals like that fight. >> how was that? >> that's hot. >> politico's mike allen, thank you very much. >> have a great august.
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>> thank you. >> still ahead, going to be okay? >> i'm getting over. it slowly but surely. i need a cold drink of water. >> take a shower. >> the new cover of "time" magazine, how american couples are reshaping the nation with one rapidly emerging trend. up next, the uconn women welcome to the white house, but is this any way to treat the president? "morning joe" will be right back. thanks to the grit and resilience and determination of the american people,
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we've been able to clear away the rubble from the financial crisis. we started to lay a new foundation for stronger, more durable economic growth. but we're not there yet. what we need is not a 3-month plan or even a 3-year plan. we need a long-term american strategy: job security with good wages and durable industries. a good education. reducing poverty. reducing inequality. growing opportunity. i'm going to keep pushing to make high-quality preschool available for every four-year-old in america it's time for the minimum wage to go up. (cheers) but i won't be able to do it alone, so i'm going to be calling... on all of us to take up this cause. good jobs; a better bargain for the middle class... and the folks who are working to get into the middle class; an economy that grows from the middle-out.
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that's what we need. (cheers) like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪
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all right. time for sports for you. the ongoing game of chicken between alex rodriguez and major league baseball continues. mlb leaking it had enough evidence against the yankees slugger, considering a lifetime ban. a-rod had said he would fight back whatever punishment was handed down. in light of that new information sources telling espn rodriguez changed his mind considering a possible settlement now. >> reminds me of the "simpsons" where mr. burns looks at homer, i have decided upon a new counter offer, you will find it very reasonable and puts zero on the paper and homer goes i'll take it. mr. burns goes, release the houpdss. that's what's happened here. the hounds are getting released because the announcement of more suspensions is expected today or
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tomorrow. >> wow. >> mike, what's happening here? is a-rod out for life? >> i think he'll end up settling for a ban that includes the rest of this year, all of next year, which in effect will be a ban for life. >> are the yankees off the hook as far as writing checks to him? >> they won't be off the hook for writing checks. >> what do they owe him, about $8 billion? >> probably about $90 million. his contract was frontloaded. >> do they write him that check or -- >> they write him a part -- >> half of it. >> except for the ban. he doesn't get paid for the ban. >> he gets paid for the rest of the contract. >> based on the evidence. let's get to highlights for you to show you happened last night, dodgers/yankees, dodgers looking to get out of a jam, pop-up to the right side, yasiel puig and mark ellis miscommunicate, two runs score on that error. yankees walk away with a 3-0 win. walk-offs, take a look with the rangers, indians and red sox. >> bell tran, a drive to left,
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way back, i don't believe it. good-bye. they've done it again. >> pay off pitch, fastball drilled deep right field, back is rios out of room, it's out of here! >> drew lines it down the right-field line. fair ball. up into the seats. red sox win. the red sox win it back into first place they go. >> all right. so you guys are going to be happy, first place in the al east, the red sox. >> finally for you the uconn women's basketball team made another trip to the white house to celebrate their national championship in april. the husky's eighth trip to the white house and the third time president obama has congratulated them. the players aren't taking it seriously anymore. check out stephanie and kia giving the commander in chief bunny ears for the cameras.
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he just smiling doesn't realize, certainly takes guts from the ladies. >> how do you think she's going to handle that? >> he's so nice. >> isn't that great. >> the greatest guy. >> he is. >> a great guy. >> what a coach. >> greatest coach ever. >> all right. still ahead, why senator tom coburn is pushing back against members of his own party for, quote, misleading the conservative base. up next, the impact yahoo!'s ceo marissa mayer is having on the company. josh tryangiel joins the table. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks.
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marissa mayer save yahoo!? can she? >> maybe. >> thank you so much. great to be here. >> you follow directions well. >> what she has is momentum for the first time. no internet company has actually ever come back before. >> right. >> they all die off. >> there's a loyalty problem, technology problem. what she has is nerd cred and she's been able to come in and through acquisitions and through recruitment getting at the nolgsists and developers back into yahoo! for the first time several years. >> how long has she been there now? >> year and two weeks and one year in, what are people saying? >> the numbers say. >> she's stopped the bleeding. more users coming back to yahoo! for the first time in several years. >> can i ask you a question? >> yeah. >> when is the last time you did a yahoo! search? >> search is done. that's part of the direction here is that even though she's a technologyist, she said we're not going to win on search or voice recognition or on texting. >> what are they going to win on? >> mobile content. they have 700 million users.
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that's a huge, huge number and we're at this transition where people are getting off desk top, moving to mobile and what she sees is a last opportunity for somebody to say we're going to make great mobile products. we know what you want from yahoo!. if we can deliver it on mobile we can grow. no instant strategy she can say five years out we'll be this. she's doing it one year at a time. >> has she given a real definition of why she wanted to leave goalogle. why leave that powerhouse to come to this flinching relic. >> she's kind of a silicon valley icon. google is a stable company and she reached the top. larry and ser ggi are not going anywhere. >> she puwas pushed down a leve. having troubles part of why she left. >> what they said is look you've done everything here, we've got new people coming in and one
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other very compelling reason to leave, she got a quite nice pay package. >> sure. >> there's a lot of people that wants to run stuff. she wants to run something. still a brand, 700 million people. >> steve? >> you have a quick question. >> we're told to go. >> been a product person all her life. can she be a ceo? can she deal with customers, finance, deal with all the other parts of that much bigger job. >> one of the critiques in the story, advertisers have not met marissa mayer. haven't heard from her. it is a big business, advertising. she's focused on this is what company is, make sure everybody understands it, build the products and generate enough momentum to make this the first real web turnaround story. >> looking for the new issue of "bloomberg business week." can marissa mayer save yahoo!? thank you. coming up former labor secretary robert reich on the nation's growing wage gap.
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>> i can analyze the entire 2016 campaign strategy through this lunch. first of all, hillary's campaign, it is on to the on. and obviously they ate outdoors to woo the environmentalists. had the jambalaya to court gulf coast democrats.
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the president's rolled up sleeves say i support the right to bear arms. but the lack of beverages says that under hillary there will be no waterboarding, tap or sparkling, and the grilled chicken was on sale at safeway. >> welcome back to "morning joe." top of the hour. mike barnicle and steve ratner are still with us and join the table, the host of msnbc's "now." alex wagner is here. >> we have a lot to talk about. now of course simal cowell you wanted to talk about simon cowell, "daily news" reporting cheating on it -- >> bob filner, filner gate. >> talk about filner. >> not only were you born in san diego, but you were once mayor yourself in san diego. what do you think -- >> i was known for a signature headlock i used to put young male interns in. >> excuse me? >> that's bob filner. >> bob filner is saying, can you do the headlock by the way on
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ratner a little later on. >> that would work. >> maybe at the end of the segment. just stretch the muscles out. >> i want to see that. >> so filner actually -- >> we could just go there. >> the lawyer is saying, i think mike barnicle would agree with the lawyer, that filner, the city was actually liable. they may sue the city of san diego for not -- which i will tell you what it means in german in a minute, for not giving him proper training when it came to sexual harassment. >> san diego's mayor bob filner accused of coming on to at least eight women, but according to his lawyer -- >> how could filner have not known. >> san diego doesn't give him the manual. >> his lawyer says the city may be held liable for not training him about sexual harassment. the democrat's attorney says the city is obligated to provide employees with guidance on what sorts of behavior is unacceptable, which he says the city never did for filner. >> poor filner. >> still the attorney said the
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lack of training doesn't excuse inappropriate behavior. the lawyer even paraphrased bob dillon. you don't need a weather person to tell you which way the wind blows. filner's former head of communications director has filed a lawsuit against him. earlier this week the san diego council voted unanimously to sue filner for any damages it incurs from the lawsuit. that is not a lead story. >> it is not. kind of got into it. let's talk instead about the next guy to be the most powerful person in the world and that is, of course, the fed chair, whoever that's going to be. >> okay. president obama's not done trying to reboot his economic message. first he hit the road with a series of public events and then he went behind closed doors on capitol hill. the president held two private sessions to rally congressional democrats around his middle-class jobs plan. republicans were not on the schedule and the house speaker didn't miss an opportunity to take a dig at that. >> i'm not going to speak for what the president is doing or
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why he's doing it. if i had poll numbers as low as his, i would probably be out doing the same thing if i were him. if i were him. >> wait a minute. i'm sorry. i'm confused. anyhow, for comparison sake boehner's favoribility is 18%, barack obama 48%. >> maybe he should meet with the democrats. >> during one of the sessions the question of the next fed chair bubbled up. according to reports, democratic congressman walked up to the microphone and simply said larry summers, bad choice. barack obama reportedly told the session not to, quote, not read everything they believe in the "huffington post" and said the site was trying to make summers into a progressive whipping boy. what? the president added this, summers was the rock ofgy ball tar in trying to work through policies to turn the economy around and i'm not going to stand idly by and let his name be disparaging and reputation
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trashed because people have a political agenda about who should or should not be chairman of the federal reserve. >> okay. alex, progressives do not like larry summers. >> yeah. >> they didn't like him when he worked for bill clinton. didn't like him when he worked for president obama. >> they didn't like him when he was at harvard university saying crazily disparaging things about women and their intelligence. >> looks like the president's moving towards larry summers. >> very telling about that meeting is, listen, i'm not going to tell you who i'm picking for fed chair but stop trashing larry summers. and look, there are a lot of people in the administration that say he is the person that the -- he has a formidable intellect, people like what he's -- he's close to the president. yellen doesn't have the same relationship. he's the shoo-in. we know this is an incredibly important appointment given the role of the fed in monetary policy and the lack of congress in terms of doing anything about the economy. >> right.
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>> so i think we are looking forward to larry summers as fed chair. >> so is "the huffington post." mike barnicle, you've known him some time, say other than his eating habits, he leaves some of his food -- >> who doesn't at this table except for alex and me. >> larry and diplomacy are strangers. okay. >> is he an arrogant guy? >> no. >> no? >> what? >> let me ask again. is larry summers a arrogant guy? >> he's a genius. he doesn't realize he's arrogant. he's going to tell you you're wrong. when he does tell you you're wrong you are wrong. larry summers as president of harvard got a bad rap on what he said about women. >> you're not going to win that with alex. i can tell. >> i know. >> she's going to put you in her headlock. >> in the signature headlock. >> i would be pleased with that. >> i know. >> oh, lord. that's exactly the reason -- >> not listening -- >> steve ratner, if you have an
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hr problem press 1. >> so larry summers, you worked with a guy, you like him. fed chief, one of the most powerful people not only in america, in the world, right? >> look, i did work with larry summers. i like him. >> he's afraid to answer my question. >> what is the question? there was no question? >> yes or no? >> tell me the question. >> is he the guy. >> fed chairman one of the most powerful positions in the world. >> i'm pressing 1 on that. >> okay. >> okay. >> now question number two. >> is summers too arrogant to be in that position. >> button number two. >> he's arrogant, isn't he? >> bill clinton who said you ain't bragging if you can actually do it. larry is a very capable guy. shrinking violet? no. was the harvard experience in all seriousness, was the harvard experience searing for him and change his style? i've known larry a long time. somewhat different person. not a shrinking violet but he is incredibly bril nant, knows the
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issues inside out and this is the second most important job in washington. >> so is the choice, though, comfortable choice for the president and some argue that he likes to surround himself with people he's comfortable with, not necessarily people who will challenge him or are the right choice. >> first, as much as i would like larry to get this, i don't know that what happened yesterday is a signal it's going to happen. i think what you saw was the president defending somebody he likes who is being sort of hauled across the coals by the democratic wing of the democratic party. i would say no. look, i think the president spent a lot of time with larry. i think they get along well. i don't think -- if he picks larry i don't think it would be a case of picking comfort over someone else who would bring some other perspective idea. >> being pointed to this article ron wrote in the national journal asking the question, what if obama can't lead? obama could still do great things, but not if he and his advisors underestimate the president's powers and don't know how to exploit them. none of his sympathizers give
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obama cover by minimizing his influence. cover to fail. not if the president is outwardly and boundlessly dismissive of his critics telling "the new york times" i'm not concerned about their opinions. to say the situation is intractable -- >> this is unbelievable. go ahead. >> to say the situation is -- >> i'm not concerned about their opinions. i'm sorry, go ahead. >> yeah. >> i'm sorry. >> to say the situation is intractable seems akin to waving a white flag over a polarized capitol. republicans suck. we can't deal with them. let's quit. i'm afraid they have to quit all of them on both sides, the white house and in congress, most democrats and republicans have abandoned -- about speaking to the converted, winning fights and positioning for blame, america would be in great hands but it's not. that last point is pretty good. >> alex? >> i mean, speaking of the
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democratic party, part of the reason the president went to the hill yesterday, democrats on the hill were like hey, what about us? you've been at lunch and dinner with the gop this whole time, nothing has come of it. they're afraid if there is any kind of bargain in the fall the president will sell democratic priorities upstream. that meeting was to reassure his constituents if you will, he was still on their side. i mean, i don't know about ron's contention that the president is just content to sit on the sidelines with his people. i do think it's questionable to say he's not concerned about other people's opinions in the media and so forth. >> i think that was part of the meeting, obviously. you know, to reassure democrats in the house he wasn't going to sell them out on a bargaining session. the larger aspect and ron alluded to it, this idea, i don't care about what my critics think. that's okay if you don't care about what your critics think, the fact you couple that with not communicating with your critics, not dealing with them, not calling them up, and either
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threatening or negotiating with them, i don't think either is being done out of oval office. >> republicans certainly are responsible for a great deal of that, steve ratner, but you got the president of the united states who has this reality, he's got a republican house. he's got a conservative house. he may have a republican senate. you can sit there and say, as ron said, hey, republicans suck, i can't deal with them, that's it. or he can figure out how to get things done. >> we can critique and criticize the president's style and what he should or shouldn't have done over the last four and a half years to try to have relationships with the republicans. more like lbj. i get all that. we don't have to go over that. i want to make the point it is very hard to deal with the other side when the other side can't deal with itself. when you have a republican party in the house that yesterday tried to bring an appropriations bill to the floor that had gone through the whole committee
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process that is a really important transportation and housing bill, and they couldn't get the moderate republicans to vote for it, boehner can't control his own caucus, who do you negotiate with? >> it's a messy process. you figure out how to do it. bill clinton passed legislation, he got democrats in the minority and moderate republicans to vote for legislation and we rolled out once every two weeks. the has sert rule works to the point that the president is smart enough, which bill clinton was, to make us feel pain. you make your enemies feel pain. if they -- if they are being obstructionists you use their obstruction against them. harry truman supposedly getting beat in 1948 ran against the do nothing congress. this president still doesn't want to roll up his sleeves -- >> but that is exactly what he did to get the tax increase on the wealthy at the end of last year. that's what he did to get the hurricane sandy relief through when, again, boehner couldn't
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deliver his people. so it's been done a couple times. i will argue it's harder today than in the '90s. >> can i just say also, the president if we are talking about incremental change, just rolling your sleeves up, getting in the mud pit, he proposed something this week that was roundly dismissed, corporate tax reform, before it was presented by house leadership. >> dismissed but as we heard yesterday, mike, you actually had saxby chambliss. >> and tom cole. >> and others talking about a possibility of it passing. >> but joe, what do you do, what do you do about an environment where the speaker of the house, i would argue, is more afraid, more fearful of his own members than he is of the president of the united states in terms of, you know, politics? >> we're acting like this is all new. for eight years george w. bush was called a nazi, for eight years george w. bush was -- we heard that george w. bush hated the constitution that wanted to shred the constitution up and
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eight years before that bill clinton. the delidge maization of a president is now the reality. it happened from 1992 to 2000, happened from 2000 to 2008, and it's now going to happen from 2008 to 2016. and if you're going to be president of the united states and have your feelings hurt because the other side will try to knock your head off your shoulders and delegitimize you from day one, for god's sake don't run for the president of the united states. that is the new reality and it sucks. not for the politicians, not for the president, but for the rest of us. >> that's right. >> and i don't know, i think interpreting mike's point a different way, isn't it a new precedent that the speaker of the house is terrified of his own caucus. i don't think of nancy pelosi as being particularly intimidated by democrats, but john boehner in a new pew poll, they're asking respondent who is in charge of the republican party, more people say nobody than john boehner. >> you could have asked the same question in 1996, 1997, up until we ran newt gingrich out of
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town. i mean you need -- i think it goes to strong leadership. you need strong leadership. nobody ever -- when tip o'neill, after the marines were killed in beirut in 1983 went downstairs to talk to his caucus and said, you know, over 200 americans have died today and if any of you think that you're going to go out and criticize the commander in chief, you're not going to have ronald reagan to answer to you're going to have me to answer to. nancy pelosi, an extraordinarily strong leader. they were scared. people were scared of nancy. >> they still are. >> i'm telling you, nancy -- >> is that a good thing. >> nancy, i love nancy. she's a sweet, wonderful person. but you know what, she puts on her helmet and goes out to play and stay out of her way because she will kill you politically if she gets a chance. you need that. that's not the president's style. the president isn't nancy pelosi. the president is not lbj. >> nor speaker boehner. >> you're saying john boehner is
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not nancy pelosi. >> i certainly am. >> all right. >> so i think we have leaders that -- >> that may be the problem. >> not as tough and strong on both sides of pennsylvania avenue and that's a real problem. >> alex wagner, thank you so much. we'll see you at noon. >> hold on. we'll see the headlock now. >> okay. it's a gentle, more of a head curl. >> right there. >> okay. >> oh. >> see. that's why they don't press charge. i'm not trying to minimize this. filner is a bad dude. >> i don't think filner kissed the women on the top of the head. >> face stroke was the problem. yeah. >> for ratner. >> oh. >> all right. we'll see you on "now" at noon. still ahead, khaled hosseini, author of "the kite runner" back with the best seller, his first novel in six years. he joins us up next, inequality for all, robert reich and director jay cobb kornbluth with
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a documentary looking at the growing gap between rich and poor. first bill karins on the weather. >> he's never going to wash that spot on the noggin, ever. good morning, everyone. what happened to the heat in the great lakes. is our beach season over with? it was only 75 again yesterday in chicago. temperatures continue to be very cool. the next two weeks look chilly up in the great lakes. so hopefully the end of august will feel like summer because it doesn't right now. rain moving up from philadelphia. it will arrive in new york city in about two hours from now. we're not seeing a lot of airport delays because of this light rain but you will see locally heavy downpours. right now one of those is heading up wilmington. as far as the forecast goes, on and off showers and storms. not a great beach day for new england either. especially from cape cod through long island, jersey shore, maryland through the outer banks. the tropics remain very quiet. this is august 1st when i start to watch what's happening out in the atlantic. when we can get the big storms. none are on the horizon.
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florida, a chance for typical storms today. the big weather headline is up there maybe in areas like alaska where it's going to be 84 today in fair banks. one of the hottest summers ever for you. a shot of new york city. looks like the clouds are thickening up. rain is on the way. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. here's how switching from fast-food to a dinner from walmart can save you over $760 a year. the average fast-food dinner costs over $6.50 per meal. a meal made with kraft recipe makers costs less than $3.10 a serving. so by replacing just one fast-food dinner a week your family of 4 can save over $760 a year. delicious kraft dinners, backed by walmart's low price guarantee. save money. live better. walmart. these are sandra's "homemade" yummy, scrumptious bars. hmm?
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>> last year we made 36,000. >> i probably made 50,000 a year working 70 hours a week. >> the middle class is struggling. >> people say to me, what nation does it better? the answer is, united states. in the decades after world war ii. the economy boomed but you had very low inequality. who is actually looking out for the american worker? the answer is nobody. >> we are losing equal opportunity in america. >> any one of you who feels cynical just consider where we
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have been. >> that was an exclusive first look at the trailer for the documentary "inequality for all." here the film's consultant and featured expert, labor professor at berkeley, robert reich and the film's director jay cocob kornbluth. it looks good. >> mr. secretary, an ongoing problem. income for -- real income has been dropping for 30, 40 years. the rich are getting richer. the poor are getting poorer. technological revolution that helped so many get rich hallowed out the middle class. where do we go from here? >> the reality, joe, is that almost every other industrialized country has done it better than we have. over the long term. that is, infant mortality is worse here, the median wage here keeps going down. it's going up elsewhere.
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you know, these structural problems are endemic around the world, but it doesn't mean we have to throw up our hands and say we can't do anything about them. >> if we don't get to work dealing with these really savage inequalities, we are going to have an economy that's not working because there's not enough aggregate demand. the middle class doesn't have enough purchasing power. we're going to have a widening gulf that is going to undermine -- already undermining our democracy. >> this is an ongoing -- >> this has been going on 30 years. >> but it's getting worse and worse and worse. >> why have we screwed things up so badly over the past three decades some. >> well, i think for many years, we didn't pay attention to it. we kept on borrowing. you know, against our homes. before that, we had a huge, huge wave of women who went into paid work. primarily i mean i wish i could say it was because there were these wonderful professional opportunities for women, most went into work in the 1980s and
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1990s to prop up family incomes already starting to drop. we -- i mean, in the clinton administration we did pay attention to it. we tried. but we didn't do enough. and the situation just gets worse and worse and worse. it's threatening the moral integrity of this country. >> jacob? >> this is why we did the movie. >> jacob, i was going to ask, when did you become inspired to do the movie. >> first i wanted to say, just hearing bob talk about this widening gap in income here is the same -- we have clips of him saying the same thing over the last 30 years. >> that's the depressing part of the movie for me. >> i've heard him say stuff like that and seen him do it in the film for 30 years now. so this has been happening and people have known about it for a long time. in my case i'm 40 and the story of my whole life is this widening gap in inequality. it's when that hit me, it hit me with sort of the revelation that this is the story of our time, it's the story of my life and i don't know if i've been able
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to -- until we made this movie i had an opportunity to step back and see the big picture of what's been happening to america because when you're living it in it day to day it doesn't hit you with the same force as when you step back and see this has been growing and widening for a long time. >> steve, looking at the big picture, obviously, you know, 19 -- you know, in the mid 1970s, globalization hits, china gets globalized in 1978, an i.t. revolution during the '90s, you know, if factories were as productive as they were in the 1990s, tens of millions of americans would still be working in factories, but that's not the case. what are some of the big causes of this and what are we doing wrong as a country? >> look, you outline the cause well. it's technological change, globalization, a bunch of different factors. i think all of you have really articulated the problem. i think the real question is where do you go from here and how do you make this better? i would respectfully disagree a
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little bit, bob, with you about other countries have done it better on income and inequality but i would not trade our economy in for anybody else in the developed world even in terms of overall growth even ger my? >> 1.7% growth. >> yeah, but real wages in germany have not grown either. >> one reason we're not growing, and the president is right about this, we don't have a large and growing middle class capable of turning around and buying what we're producing. >> let's talk about how you solve the problem. so how do we create a large and growing middle class within our free market, capitalist system? >> this is what the movie gets to. the movie is really kind of an inconvenient truth for the middle class. it gets to what has happened, why it's happened, no villains, this is not class warfare. this is about connecting the dots. >> i got that. how do you solve the problem? >> one thing i think we need to do is deal first of all with the savage inequalities in our educational system. we have the most segmented
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educational system if you are in a poorer community or a lower middle-class community you have a lousy school. >> education. that's number one. >> another huge thing has to do with structural investment in our infrastructure. >> right. >> we have -- and in our basic research and development which we are not doing. we have deferred maintenance all over the country. a third area has to do with tax reform. a fourth area has to do with our capital markets. a fifth area -- there is not one specific -- >> totally agree. not one silver bullet. >> and that's the frustrating part. we're talking about trends, we get republicans yelling at democrats and democrats yelling at republicans, as if this all happened when the democratic president got elected or before that when the republican president got elected. no. this started happening when nixon was president. >> that's right. that's what's important about having a movie like this. it steps out of the 24-hour news cycle and political bickering and looks at it from a bird's eyeview in a way that is acce
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accessible to everybody. my wife is a school teacher and hates economics and not just because her husband made it but she loves this movie -- >> thank god. i thought she was going to say she hates economics because her husband loves economics. >> she feels like she wanted to get it, understand what was happening, and not understand it as a republicans versus democrats issue, something happening to the nation issue. >> it's interesting. one of my sons said when he looked at the movie, he said, dad, this is the first time in 30 years i've understood what you've been trying to talk about and write about and this is coming out in 25 major media markets september 27th. and we hope that it really does galvanize a major national discussion, not a political kind of battering ram, not a class warfare but a serious discussion about what's going on and what we can do. >> it's important to note that 25 markets for a documentary is a great release.
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>> it's huge. >> and it shows that this issue is something that a lot of people want to know about. >> in the four solutions you put on the table you didn't get to pay. i mean, and minimum pawage and we're covering over the past few weeks, fast food workers striking or protesting at least because their pay is so ridiculously pathetically low. i mean, how does that get solved? can we ask corporate leaders who are making profits to pay people better? that sounds really -- >> we don't have to ask. we have something called a minimum wage. we started it in the 1930s. >> two issues. raising the minimum wage but companies maybe, perhaps, not sitting on corporate greed. >> then low-wage workers just above the minimum wage -- >> and can't live. >> $10 an hour -- >> something called the earned income tax credit we can expand but we also know that as long as companies treat their workers as cost be cut than as assets to be
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developed, not only over the long term are these workers going to be hurt and they are being hurt, but companies are not going to do well because they're going to have more and more turnover. it's not in their interest. they have such a short-term timed horizon, many of the companies, they're not thinking about their workers as potential assets. >> but they're not -- companies are doing well and they're doing very well. >> well, they're doing very well right now, but, in fact, if you look at what is happening to the economy as a whole, you know, 1.7% growth when you've had this kind of economic problem over the last five years is not good. many people look at the stock market and say, you know, it's into the going to continue like this. >> of course it's not good but i don't think it's going to be solved by companies paying their workers more because they feel like it. >> steve, it's not a matter of feel like it. if we raise the minimum wage to be closer to even what it was adjusted for inflation in 1968 -- >> which would be -- >> $10.25 right now, but that's
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not even a living wage. i mean you saw what walmart did, you know, they passed out a little thing for their employees about how -- what you can do to budget. it was a laughing stock. >> mcdonald's -- >> and mcdonald's said $25 a month for health care. >> get another job. >> get another job at the same time. we've got huge numbers of people in this country who are barely making it, working harder than ever and their children are getting -- going to lousy schools and they know that the deck is stacked -- the deck is stacked against them. a lot of the anger and frustration in this country expressed in politics comes directly out of this frustration. >> that's right. what i keep trying to point out, what are the solutions. how do you do this within the framework over system as it exists unless you propose changing our system in a dramatic way. >> we did for the first three decades after the second world war, a far more rapidly growing
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economy, far more egol tare yan -- >> i get all that -- >> but steve, what did we do then that we stopped doing in 1970 -- >> we've had technological change, globalizatioglobalizati >> why shouldn't technological change work for all of us? in other words, we write the rules. we determine what the economy ought to be. >> the problem is, the united states in 1945, we were the last standing major power economically. i mean europe was decimated and destroyed and we had to rebuild it. of course we did well in the '40s, we did well in the '50s, and '60s and then germany, japan, started retooling, started rebuilding and they started competing with us and then in the '70s we started seeing dotsons and nissans driving down the street, started panic, in the '80s, detroit started to hallow out. these are huge historical trends. i'm just saying, and listen, by the way, i'm with you, and by
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the way, alan greenspan is with you. i loved when i heard alan greenspan say one of the great risks to american capitalism is inequality. i think we all agree. there are though -- we can agree there are no quick fixes. >> no quick fixes. >> this is extraordinarily important to educate people on what is the real challenge of our time. this is economically, as much of a challenge to conservatives as to liberals. >> absolutely. >> how do we get there? >> if you would like more information in iequality for wa text ready to 55155 or like them on facebook.com/inequalityforall. >> fantastic. >> very forward thinking. robert reich and jacob kornbluth, thank you so much. don't miss our deeper discussion later today on income inequality watch it on afternoon mojo.msnbc.com. fil still ahead a preview of tomorrow's key jobs report.
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up next a new report says the u.s. and afghanistan are close to a deal when it comes to american troop levels in that country. what will it mean for next year's planned withdraw? "morning joe" is back in a moment. [ dad ] so i walked into that dealer's office and you know what i walked out with? [ slurps ] [ dad ] a new passat. [ dad ] 0% apr. 60 months. done and done. [ dad ] in that driveway, is a german-engineered piece of awesome. that i got for 0% apr. good one, dad. thank you, dalton. [ male announcer ] it's the car you won't stop talking about. ever. hurry in to the volkswagen best. thing. ever. event. and get 0% apr for 60 months, now until september 3rd. that's the power of german engineering. the beach on your tv is much closer than it appears. seize the summer with up to 50% off hotels at travelocity.
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the president has been
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considering a complete exit of american troops from afghanistan by 2014, but now, a deal allowing u.s. personnel to stay well beyond then is reportedly close to being done. a recent pentagon report concluded that afghanistan -- >> wait. so you're saying the troops aren't leaving in 2014? >> well -- >> because they've only been there for 13 years by then. >> yeah. well a recent pentagon report concluded that afghanistan is going to need a significant military presence, plus financial resources, far into the future. and secretary kerry says the u.s. is drawing down, not withdrawing. afghanistan is in a renewed state of frugality. the u.n. reported yesterday 23% more afghan civilians were killed or injured in the first half of 2013 than during the same period last year. this is the first season afghan personnel have been leading the bulk of military and police operations.
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>> mike, you he know, when you saw the general on the front of the "new york times" talking about the need to keep american troops there, you knew this was coming. >> there's going to be a permanent post, a permanent post in afghanistan for years to come, probably 30,000 united states troops in that country because they can't -- they can't protect themselves. the afghan army, the afghan police forces, are inadequate to the task. >> and so our men and women stay there with targets on our backs. >> and our treasure. >> tomorrow's show the former head of the nasa, retired generl michael hayden, his take on the splitting congress's agency's controversial spy programs. that will be interesting. when none is enough, ra deka jones is here to reveal "time" magazine's cover story on the interesting trend of couples choosing a child-free life. they look happy on the cover. that's all i'm going to say. >> we have like 47 children
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43 past the hour. welcome back to "morning joe." joining us with the new issue of "time" magazine executive editor radhika jones and the newest co-host of msnbc's "the cycle" abby huntsman. welcome. congratulations, abby. >> thank you. >> you know you've been embraced when you're invited to sit at the "morning joe" table into you're in the house. radhika, this is kind of amazing. the numbers here of couples choosing not to have kids going up? >> i mean, the birth rate, dropped a staggering 9% just from 2007 to 2011. >> that's right. and it's not all voluntary childless couples, by the way, but there are more and more couples who are, you know, deciding for reasons of
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economics, that children are too expensive, but also just for women in particular, and that's how the birth rate is measured, let's not forget. not men who have children. it's all -- >> we're still having kids. yep. >> so -- but, you know, as we talk about in the story, a real underlining thing here is postponement. women have more opportunities in the work place now. >> that is choice. >> it is choice. and when we talk about choice that's often what we're talking about. it's not as if -- one interesting thing, when you ask young women how many children do you want, they almost all say two. people start out wanting kids, a lot of them. but then, you know, your life happens. i mean you have a fantastic job. you have an opportunity to travel. >> this is happening to all professional women. it's happening to you. >> yeah. i, in fact, don't have children and, you know, that may still change for me, but certainly i grew up as one of three siblings and i always thought that's what
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i'll have, i'll have three kids. it didn't work out that way for a lot of excellent reasons. >> i grew up as one of seven, grew up in utah. obviously mormon. for me, i'm surprised even here in new york city the question isn't are you having kids, it's when are you having kids. it's not an option. >> or now if. >> so that is the interesting thing. there's still a lot of pressure on women. they really are judged for these choices, for whether it's -- >> you talk about america's mommy culture. >> a little bit, yeah. it's striking to me, and this is by the way coming a week after a royal baby frenzy, so it's very much in our minds, but it's striking to me that you have a drop in women having children at the same time that you have what i perceive at least and you guys can disagree is a sort of rise of like the cult of motherhood. we see it in the tabloids. when i was growing up you didn't see baby bump watches, celebrities' kids. you saw the stars themselves. >> and also you talk about in new york city, when we -- we are
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on the west side, i was shocked, upper west side, there's baby carriages, they seem to be everywhere, everywhere you go, and for women, and you talk about this, it's difficult for women who decide not to have children because womenhood and motherhood seem to be so intertwined. >> i think they often are. certainly and my perception of this, you know, again is a little personal, but certainly it seems that way often in the work place. when you talk -- when we talk about women's issues in the work place they tend to default to maternity leave and flexible time and those are important issues but not the only issues that women face in the workplace. >> i think you touched on the pressures that women face and i know that when i speak to young women in large groups about their careers and their lives and always say, don't forget to have children and they look at me like, is that okay to feel that way? they almost look relieved. i say don't forget to pursue a relationship and life outside of work. that's just as important. and i wonder, abby, if you feel
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in some ways with your -- in your friends and circles, if they feel that pressure to sort of not, you know, be focused on family and not be focused on latching on to someone and it's all work, work, work. >> definitely more so for millennials. this different mindset for women, more women are going to college, getting jobs outside of school, and so there's less of this pressure but we talked about this earlier, women are jud judged, no matter what they do. you don't have kids, you have kids, one kid, seven kids. what's wrong with you? >> women judge women judge women. mike i wanted to ask you, you never know anybody until you drive around with them in their hometown all day i did that with mike barnicle after we knew each other for four or five years. i heard mike, he was on the phone constantly talking to his kids. i said -- and his grandkids. >> he has -- >> he's like for 25 years, i've done two things. i've worked and i've raised
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children. and so when -- i'm serious. when i was in the car with you, my friends, why don't you have friends anymore? i don't have time. i work and i'm with my children. and i'm not knocking it, mike, but seriously, people ask what you do when you're at home. i said mike works and he's got 87 children. look, don't they look so happy, mike. what did we do wrong? you know, the thing is, though -- >> that is so foreign. >> would you ever trade it in, though, for anything? >> no. it's life's ultimate reward. but joe, when i reached the age of 70 years, when i'm 70 years of age, i will have been the parent of a minor child for 50 years. for half a century. but i will tell you, there is a cultural disconnect when you encounter people at a party or wherever and you hear the phrase, how many kids do you have and you're told, well, we've chosen not to have kids. there's nothing wrong with that. it's a choice a woman makes or a couple makes, but when you hear
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it, it sounds so odd in our culture. >> for me, the broader picture here is just that our conceptions of family are still evolving and, you know, it used to be america used to be focused on the nuclear family. america used to be raised, you know, the nuclear family. two gay men and their twin sons. it can be me and my mom. it can be me and my siblings. we found they're closer to their parents. it may be as they age, those family units -- >> i mean, but that's, there are economic realities too. families suddenly 23, 24, 45 years living at home too. >> you're at a store, at a gas station, and someone behind you says, hey, dad, and you turn around. >> i've been doing it for 25 years and -- >> what's the right way to
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approach it? >> what? >> how do you ask women, are you having kids, when are you having kids? that we often ask when we're out at social outings? >> apparently -- >> i mean, i guess i would say, must we ask? i'm not sure. it's human curiosity and points of bonding and points of commonalty. but it's difficult to do. >> i think it's how you ask. i think it's -- it's, you know, do you have kids? what? >> there's one more example of how women have it harder than men on all counts. because as abby said before, there just ain't no winning. if you got kids and you spend a lot of time with the kids, then women who don't have kids at the office might look -- and vice versa. if you don't have kids, the mothers go home to their children. i never been around a professional working woman, my
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mother included, that wasn't tortured -- >> you see the movie "i don't know how she does it"? watch it. >> unbelievable. >> the new issue of "time" magazine is out now. >> look at the background. we don't usually get background. usually they just give us sheets of paper that have, like, cartoons on them. you know, blondie and dagwood -- >> she is not writing -- neither advocating a childless life -- >> it could be a viagra commercial. >> i hope my mom is watching. >> i think this is how sensitive -- because you guys always just say wing it and go and do whatever, but -- >> no, it is a sensitive topic, for sure. there are women and you'll meet them in the story who are very definitive about making the choice. they don't feel the need or desire to be a mother.
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but for a lot of women, myself included, the decision happens on a continuum. your life is happening meanwhile and you have other strong commitments and you have other ways that you become fulfilled. you know, it's -- >> you say your mom's watching. is your mom bugging you? when am i going to be grand mop? >> my mom is such a good mom, she knows better. >> thank you so much. what a great cover. abby huntsman, congratulations and thank you as well. good for you. on "the cycle" on msnbc. still ahead, senator tom coburn launches a new effort for congressional power. plus, our conversation with "new york times" best selling author call lead hosseini. and jeffrey tambor from
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up next, the ongoing war of words between governor chris christie and senator paul rand. "morning joe" will be right back. [ school bell rings ] ♪ school's out for summer ♪
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good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. on the west coast. as you take a live look at new york city. back with us on set, we have thomas roberts. >> you know there's some big news today. >> yeah, there is. >> big news. >> as simon cowell was saying, right? >> i don't want to talk about that. >> also, the tapes are out. you have the churchill world war ii tapes, the lbj tapes, the clinton tapes. did you see this? monica. i could take my clothes off. please don't, monica. >> okay, mike barnicle and --
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>> aren't we feeling all -- >> yeah, you should. steve rattner's here and in washington howard dean. a new report on the tsa. the agency tasked with keeping weapons and explosives off planes and passengers safe that could cause big concern for air travelers. as nbc news justice correspondent pete williams explains, the report accuses tsa employees of everything from sleeping on the job to letting friends and baggage through. other workers are accused of stealing from passengers. >> reporter: an airport screener is caught on surveillance video running carry-ons through a metal detector without stopping to review each image. suspended 30 days. at another airport, a screener walk, away to help a family member at the ticket counter, then takes the family carry-on and bypasses screening. suspended seven days. and the gao told congress that half the screeners who fall asleep on the job receive less than even the minimum level of
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discipline called for by tsa's own policies. >> rather than punishing these employees, tsa chose to go easy on those who find it hard to stay away while protecting the american people. >> reporter: misconduct cases at tsa went up 27% over the past three years. about 9,600 in all. most for failing to show up as scheduled, violating security rules or sleeping on duty. >> of the 9,600 cases, about half resulted in letters of reprimand, 31% resulted in suspensions and 17% resulted in the employee's removal from tsa. >> reporter: tsa insists that it is tough on the worst offenders, firing 380 employees over the past decade for theft for example. including a screener at the orlando airport who admitted stealing four laptop computers from passenger baggage. >> if we can prove an individual is stealing, if we can prove an individual is taking drugs, if we can prove an individual is
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intentionally subjugating the security system and we can prove it, immediately they're out the door. >> reporter: but says the tsa without definitive proof employees get letters of reprimand. in a work for of more than 56,000, most of them professional, bad things are going to happen. >> people sometime, do stupid things. >> what's the problem here? i mean, is the problem -- i mean, the pay is very low, right? >> the pay is very low. >> if you're working at washington reagan national and you're working tsa screeners and you decide to quit and go over across the hall to work at the dunkin' donuts, you're probably getting a pay raise, aren't you? >> i'm not sure it goes that far. these are entry level jobs and they attract people with entry level skills. >> dunkin' donuts, those munchkins. >> we've all seen the monotony. but also man.
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they need to -- they need to get more professionals in there, pay more money. >> really? >> if it's about protecting the skies, protect the skies. if not, let us just walk through. >> to pay more money, they have to appropriate more money, then we're back to congress. >> unlike big companies like fast food companies that make good profits but just don't pay people well because they don't want to. >> the time tested -- it's not going to smooth over a recent rift. rand paul wants to get together. he wants to put it all behind them. >> when he sort of does this olive branch, it sounds so concocted. the rift was highlighting some of the friction within the republican party over national security and spending. now the u.s. senator from kentucky is looking to put differences aside but it doesn't appear to be on the top of chris christie's list. >> we're going to have to patch
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things up. if we can sit down. i'm inviting him for a beer any time he would like to sit down. i will formalize it and put it in writing. i think we can sit down and mend things. at times, people have said chris christie has some libertarian le leanings so it's ironic we see him criticizing libertarians in the party. the offer to have a beer with chris christie stands. if he wants to break bread and see if we can find common ground, i think it will help the party to not have us feuding. >> have you suggested the two of you sit down and have a beer and -- >> i'm running for governor of new jersey, i really don't have time at the moment. if i find myself down in washington, i'll certainly look him up. i've got work to do here. >> i mean -- >> christie also said he's not surprised by the attacks from senator paul say, quote, he's not the first politician who's used me to get attention in the
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national media and he sure won't be the last. speaks also to the lack of a clear leader in the gop. a new poll showing 36% of republicans don't know who lead their party. that number actually is about 70%. lower than it should be. because actually 104% of republicans have no idea -- >> oh, stop. howard likes that. >> another 22 say nobody does. there's also a split over the direction of the gop. 54% of voters in the party want it to become more conservative. 40% would prefer a more moderate path. and, mika, this politico story this morning is talking about how the most important people in the republican party, as far as getting them ready for the next election, the donors, i mean, there's still a real hangover from 2012. a lot of the crazy radical bat pooh type of people that were in
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the primary. >> exactly. what he just said, politico pointing out liberal groups are beating republicans so far this year in the money race. when it comes to trying to win back control of the house, a leading democratic superpac has raised $3 million in the first six months of 2013. compare that to groups working to elect republican candidates. they've raised only about $1 million combined. >> howard, again, republicans are not completely out in the cold here. nate silver suggesting they may win back the u.s. senate. of course, he works sports so i don't know -- but anyway, it's certainly not all lost for the republican party, they could be in good shape. but this is a party clearly in search of itself. >> yeah, it's fascinating to watch this. first, lesson one is, for rand paul, who is, by the way, not a
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libertarian. if you believe you ought to tell women what to do with their reproductive rights, you're not a libertarian. lesson number one for rand paul is do not take on a guy from jersey. obviously this guy does not watch hbo. you're not going to win a fight like this with chris christie. that's not the way it's going to happen. secondly, the real problem is the grassroots of the republican party is at odds with what the policymakers understand really has to happen. they are way out there. this stuff that's going on in north carolina and texas, this anti-women stuff and all this, that is not the way to advertise -- this is a national story. so the national races are going to get tainted by what's going on in texas and north carolina in terms of the anti-abortion, the anti-union, the anti-everything. i think the republicans have got trouble, they really do. they don't -- sort of the cooler heads don't seem to have either the vision or the willingness to prevail. if they don't prevail, i do not
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think nate silver is going to be right. i think it's going to be tough. >> well, and nate silver's usually right. people in new york think democrats are -- >> all right, let me just say that gail collins writes for "the new york times," politics come to a screening halt. one of the least attractive legacies of barack obama will be the way he empowered freshman senators to believe they were only one or two good speeches away from the presidency. right now the show horses of the united states senate are rand paul of kentucky, ted cruz of texas and marco rubio of florida, all preparing for a 2016 presidential bid, all making visits to iowa. they're the new faces of the republican party. really, really new. the three of them have an average age of 45 and an average tenure in washington of 1.9 years. that's not necessarily a bad thing. paul and cruz in particular tend to drive other republican
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senators nuts. asked by the new republic with he would support rand paul or hillary clinton for president, mccain laughed and said, it's going to be a tough choice. actually, it wouldn't. if rand paul got nominated for president, mccain would be the honorary national chairman of republicans for hillary. >> you know, this is one of the things that it's driven me crazy about. republicans talking about marco rubio from the day he gets sworn in. the say republicans who were saying barack obama didn't have enough experience to be president of the united states. but actually caught fire and became an historic character in part because he's an african-american and republicans, that's what republicans go around scowling about. now they're doing that to one of their own, marco rubio. because he's hispanic. and it is so clear watching marco rubio fumble through one situation after another, that
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he's not ready. barack obama had been a much better president if he'd actually waited a couple of years? hell, yeah. would -- is marco rubio, rand paul, any of them guys -- no, it's not a knock on them personally, they just got there. >> marco rubio is an interesting case. he should look at the last three months of 2011 and the romney campaign. because the further that mitt romney walked to the right in the primaries, he realized he couldn't get back. and marco rubio can't get back now. he's gone so far right on some issues. and he's so confused on a couple of other issues. but the most interesting aspect of the republican party, at least i find it the most interesting aspect, part of it occurred here yesterday, steve. tom cole was on. congressman cole was on. followed by senator saxby
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chambliss. listening to obama's proposals and everything. the division within the republican party is really, really interesting. >> no question but i think -- i agree with everything joe said about people who have been in congress for an hour and then deciding to run for president. i think there is one distinction between these guys and president obama. which is particularly ted cruz and rand paul, they're way out there on the fringe of -- ideologically of their own party, let alone america. obama, call him liberal, what you want, but not on the fringe. pretty much down the middle of the plate of the democratic party. you've got guys who are both not ready and also takie inine inind positions. >> a lot of that has to do with the fact of where you live and what your views are. there are a lot of people in middle america who don't see ted cruz or rand paul or marco rubio
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out of the mainstream. a lot of people, as many people don't think they are as people don't think barack obama is. >> they're not even in the mainstream of the republican party. barack obama was in the mainstream of the party. >> i think if you look at when these guys come in in 2010, they are in the mainstream of the republican party. when you look at the fact in 2010, it's not like there were a couple of people who snuck into offers. republicans won the largest legislative landslide on the state and national level i think probably in the 20 -- in a century. it was a remarkable victory for them. the problem that some of them don't understand is that in american politics, you know, life rolls on really, really quickly. so i want to push back and say -- and drain ideology from this argument. in part because i'm the only
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republican in the zip code. but also because barack obama won because, in part, because he was against the iraq war. and that was a very big ideological driver for him and hillary clinton wasn't. >> you bring up a really interesting point. that is character . what nobody's talking about, you just alluded to, rubio for example hanging himself not because he's getting so far out, because he's vacillating. voters can't stand people who vacillate. the right pushes him and now he's backing away. that's the attraction of chris christie. that's what these guys have to worry about. it's not just that they're way out there and rand paul wants to get rid of the fed which would essentially sink the american economy. it's that chris christie knows who he is. in washington, people dance around a lot when the pressure gets on. and people don't want that in
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their president. i think christie is going to be a formidable influence. he's going to have a hard time getting the nomination because he is much more moderate than most republicans are who vote in the primary. but he's an impressive guy because he practices conviction politics. >> and, thomas, he's exactly right, howard's exactly right. marco rubio's biggest problem is he's vacillating. he's saying one thing when he's speaking spanish and saying another when he's speaking to, you know, english-speaking stations. and whoever's guiding him needs to be fired right now. >> what do you think if chris christie had gotten an invitation from the senator, saying, i'd like to come to jersey and have a beer with you on the jersey shore this summer, we're about to have a break in august, you think chris christie would have taken him up on that? >> he doesn't have time to do that because the whole thing is stupid. >> these are washington games and chris christie just doesn't play them. >> you talk about these guys just getting there or being
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there for an hour. i'm not sure that matters. are they -- >> yes, it matters. because barack obama almost six years in, i'm going to get tweets the rest of the day, the guy, six years in, still doesn't know how to run the office. why doesn't he know how to run the office? for the same reason that you wouldn't want me running the chemistry lab, you know, at princeton. because i didn't do it. he doesn't know -- >> he's a great leader. is going in that fish bowl idiots that nobody likes -- >> mika, actually knowing how things work, understanding the calls to make. you look how lyndon johnson did it. you look how fdr did it. you look how ronald reagan did it. mika, barack obama, i know this is -- shatters everything -- >> i'm not talking about barack obama, i'm talking about rand paul and ted cruz. are they distinguished characters? >> it's the same exact thing. >> are they leaders? >> it's the same exact thing.
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barack obama was only in for about two minutes before he decided he was bored with the senate and wanted to be president. he came in ill equipped to be the leader of washington, d.c. rand paul, if he ran for president, one, would be ill equipped. you know what, stay there for more than a few minutes. it's like six years in. who wrote the open ed? oh, that's the question this morning -- >> about leadership? >> about leadership. >> yeah. >> what if barack obama -- this is nothing personal against barack obama. i'm not going to let you fix my car if you don't -- and i'm in the middle of a desert if you don't have experience fixing cars. >> everything has changed so much over the last 10, 15 years in terms of leadership in washington. it used to be there was fear of the presidency. in terms of, you know, you're either with me or, you know, we're not going to get any roads or anything built in your state. that fear is gone because they have a different constituency in
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the senate and the house. they can go on twitter. they can go on cable tv in their own districts. >> what's coming up next? >> coming up, one of those unique pairings that only happen on "morning joe." our conversation with best-selling author of "the kite runner," khalid hosseini and "arrested development's" jeffrey tambor. up next, tom coburn weighs in on a growing rift among republicans when it comes to surveillance and spending. but first, bill karins with a check of the forecast. >> just doing my job. every day. like it or not. gro good morning, everyone. hurricane season under way. the predictions are for an active season. 7 to 11 hurricanes. we're two months in and no hurricanes yet. now we're getting into the busy part of the season. september 10th is the peak.
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let me show you one of the reasons why we're not seeing hurricanes now. this is africa. every now and then, these big huge saharan dust storms blow off the coast. we have a huge one now heading across the atlantic. these storms can't exist in this environment with all the dust. so it will be at least a week till all this dust moves out. then we'll have a more active season. as far as the weather in the lower 48, not a lot of problems. rain from philly to new york. minor delays at newark. you're just plain old hot right now in texas. it's going to stay that way throughout much of the start of august. you're watching "morning joe." we're brewed by starbucks. with the fidelity
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an. breaking news from overseas. nbc news is reporting snowden has left the moscow airport. nbc news jim maceda. >> reporter: it's breaking news, a big deal. we're talking about six weeks of being locked up pretty much at least in a semiprison-like status at that transit lounge in the moscow airport. confirmed by snowden's lawyer today snowden was issued temporary asylum in russia for a year. that asylum is renewable year after year indefinitely. it's a big deal because we expected him to get an i.d. card
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only while he waited for a process that normally would take 3 to 6 months. this, you might say, was fast tracked by russian officials. so when we asked snowden where he was going, the lawyer said he would not say, not even to confirm if snowden would be staying in moscow or going elsewhere in russia, citing security reasons. we don't know how that affects the trip from snowden's father, who was supposed to arrive here in the days or weeks ahead. so it's an amazing situation. that eric holder had sent that letter to the officials here. saying he would not -- that snowed be would not be harmed in any way, that he would not face the death penalty or torture. there was a reply from the russians. we don't know what the russian justice ministry said in reply. but this could well be interpreted as the russian government's reply to that
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letter. he not only has asylum but he has asylum faster than anyone on record. >> nbc's jim maceda, thank you. we'll stay on top of that. here with us now from capitol hill, republican senator from oklahoma, senator tom coburn. good morning, senator. a lot to get to you with. first, let's ask for your thoughts on snowden receiving temporary refugee status, as it pertains especially to u.s./russia relations. >> i think it probably hurt the relationship. you know, he's undoubtedly, in my mind, a traitor to our country. and probably most what he knows the russians already know. so the assessment damage to our country's security and, you know, it's a gold mine for them. >> we'll be following this to get more information in. let's now turn to the republican
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bid to defund obama care. i want to read a pretty harsh column by eric erickson about you, sir. i'm not going to read the title, but it says coburn is willing to wage a holy war against wasteful pork barrel spending but on obama care these days and other issues outside of government pork coburn chose the leadership line held up as the reasonable conservative by leadership on mike lee's defund strategy. senator coburn says it's impossible. i wish tom coburn would join the fight with mike lee, ted cruz, rand paul and marco rubio, having expect so much time with republican leaders peddling can't instead of try, i give up hope he can change in the twilight of his senate career. your response, sir, to that? >> you can't respond to the bloggers. i mean, one period in a six month, i'm a hero and the next time i'm not. the fact is unless you agree with them 100% of the time, you
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don't pass muster. so that's a blogger on red state that i obviously can't please. i'm not sure how to best characterize -- nobody's ever put me in anybody's camp other than my own. and so what we're trying to do, nobody disagrees with the goal, they just disagree with the tactics. >> but there certainly is criticism that your colleague es can't seem to find unity on issues. >> mika, that's not true. i mean, you have 11 republican senators out of 46. that means 35 don't agree with the strategy. so the press loves to say there's a division. sure, there's 11 senators with some outside groups behind them to try to promote a strategy. in my, you know, 65 years of life think is a pregnant strategy that will deliver
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nothing other than pain. and not be successful. and so, you know, it's not that their motivations aren't good. their motivations are right. i'd love to get obama care. because it's going to be terrible for the country in the long run. it's going to be terrible for patients and doctors. it's going to be terrible for costs. the fact is, if you have a strategy what you ought to do is build internally support for that strategy and come to an agreement so that you have all the power of the republicans working it. rather than have a small group of republicans who then generate through outside groups pressure on other republicans. my attitude and joe knows this, mike barnicle knows this, you start pushing me, all you do is get me to push back harder. so, you know, i'm kind of like -- mike said he'd been the father of a minor child for 50
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years. i've been a minor child for 50 years. i'm just now getting mature. i know what i believe and i know why i believe it and no outside group's going to push me around. >> well, i certainly wouldn't see 65 as the twilight of your career. steve rattner. >> i think they may in the senate. >> i hope 65 isn't the twilight of a career or a number of us are in trouble. turning to the broader budget issue that's going on. yesterday, the house pulled the hud and transportation adr appropriations bill because they didn't have the votes to pass it. so the situation seemed more unravelled. the senate going one way. the house going another way. not keeping all their people together. you've got recesses coming. very few regulative days left till october 1. how does this play out inner i s in terms of getting us a
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government that's still functioning? >> all of what you just said, the one thing that's lacking i think in congress and in the white house is leadership. how do you get there? how is it harry reid never put bills on the floor until two weeks ago for appropriations? how is it we don't have an agreement which 43 senators on the other side voted for? how is it we don't have that agreement? are we spending too little money as a federal government? the contention by the president would be yes. but where's the leadership to solve those problems? where's the meetings? the fact is, we don't have any leadership. i think you'll see at break neck speed coming up to september 30th all sorts of maneuvering. at the end of september 30th, you'll see a cr that will continue the government.
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which is terrible. we're foot doing our jobs if that's what we're doing. we're certainly not giving the flexibility and the planning capability to the agency. but i think that's what you're going to see. >> mika introduced this segment by reading erick erickson's piece about you on red state. it raises the question in my mind, have we reached a point in your business, the business of politics, where a certain percentage of senators and members of congress paid more attention now to bloggers and tweeters than they do to the voters and to the larger interests of the country? >> well, mike, that may be the case. i think the number one thing they don't pay attention to is the u.s. constitution. and the u numerated powers enlisted in there in the 10th amendment. that's what they're not paying attention to.
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i'm going to introduce the enumerated powers act today. there's not one democrat on there. all it says is when you're going to pass a bill, justify it by relating to the constitution where you get the power to do that. because we wouldn't be $17 trillion in debt if we actually followed the constitution. what our founders set as a very limited government. so we wouldn't be there. we are in a mess. i call it the kindergarten in washington because we really lack leadership and what we have is selfish desires for political power, rather than thoughtful consideration about what's in the best long-term interest of our country as a whole and what are we putting at risk when we don't have the leadership that redirects us to think long term and also think in terms of the limited government? i think our kids are a great risk right now. >> i agree.
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senator, good to see you. coming up, his international best-seller "the kite runner" was made into a movie. now author khalid hosseini is back with a new novel inspired by his childhood in afghanistan. "morning joe" will be right back. i'm tony siragusa and i'm training guys who leak a little, to guard their manhood with new depend shields and guards. the discreet protection that's just for guys. now, it's your turn. get my training tips at guardyourmanhood.com
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"first day of my life" by bright eyes you're not just looking for a house. you're looking for a place for your life to happen.
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i'm not here to sell anything. i'm going to kabul to find a boy. >> a boy? this boy? >> yeah. >> what he means to you? >> his father meant a lot to me. he's the man in the photo. he's dead now. >> was a friend of yours? >> he was my brother. >> that was a scene from the 2007 film "the kite runner" based on the best selling book
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by khalid hossaeini which he wrote ten years ago. he's now out with a new book "and the mountains echoed." joining us with "arrested development's" jeffrey tambor. what inspired "and the mountains echoed"? >> it began as a very small idea about three people walking across a desert. it was a man who was pulling a little red radio flyer wagon with a little girl inside it and there was a boy following them. there was an image that just came to me with perfect clarity. as often happens, my novels begin small with an image or bit of dialogue. i began exploring it. i saw this was turning into this sweeping family drama. that was, you know, this was a family that was going to kabul and something was going to happen to these people in kabul that was going to split this family apart and that this separation would then have sort of this rippling effect across
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generations and continents on a whole slew of different characters. so the novel just kind of snowballed, beginning very small and just got bigger and bigger. >> and in "the kite runner" we learned about dynamics between fathers and sons. we learned about mothers and daughters. now you focus more on siblings. what was the message you wanted to move in this book? >> well, you know, this book is really a love story and it's a family story. i was very moved by the relationship between this boy who's 10 years old and his little 3-year-old sister who love each other absolutely guilelessly and they're separated at a young age. that separation of these two people who love each other becomes a looming presence. >> i'm awe struck, i'm a huge fan of yours. i'm also the owner of a book store so i'm doubly pleased. >> thank you. >> you know, i have five
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children and i read from 5:00 to 7 ea 7:30, we read in our house. i was wondering, how important was that, the oral tradition, in your family, what influence was that? >> oh, i grew up, like you, around a lot of books. my parents were very literate people. there were books all over the house. one aspect of afghan cultural life is poetry. in school, we were expected to memorize classic poems and be able to recite it. in fact, poetry is part of the afghan soul. you will go to the most remote village in the distant part of afghanistan and you will see a villager and he can probably recite to you, even though he's ill literate, verses and verses of classic poetry. it's sort of the spirit in the afghan soul. so it's part of my upbringing.
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in fact, the poetry has quite a prominent place in "the mountains echoed." >> what do you do on the empty screen? what do you do? what do you do to write? >> well, are you talking about writer's block? >> you got it. talk to me. >> he's asking for some free counseling. >> from the author of -- >> from one of the great, great authors of our day. >> what do you do for inspiration? >> you know, i just wait and something will happen. i just go and just start writing something. i would say it's a little bit like, you know, those old postage stamps. the tough part was to take off that first little stamp and then the rest came off easy. the tough part is to start something. i have an actually healthy relationship with it. i don't look at it as "i can't think of anything." i look at it rather as something about the way i'm approaching
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the story is not working and it's time for me to think outside the box, to step back and take a panoramic view at my approach, and often that has been followed by some kind of incite, some kind of surprise that i didn't see coming. and it kind of changed the ten ush of what i was doing. >> so you wait for something to happen. and jeffrey's follow-up to that would be, what do you do when nothing happens, right? >> you start drinking. >> so let's ask about your process. you know, hemingway always wrote in the morning. but he was a big believer, you write. you get up and write. whether you think you have anything or not. and you slug it out. you fight the page, you fight the pen. do you have a specific process every day? >> yeah, when i'm writing a book, and i'm not always writing a book, but when i'm writing a book, i try to do it every single day. in fact, i do do it every single day. i get up and i write from about
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9:00 till about 2:00 when my kids come home and i'm a full-time dad. but i have to sit and write. i don't plan anything out. i have no idea where my characters are going. i have a vague notion that particular day. it never goes where i think it's going to go. it always ends up surprising me. which is what i love about the creative process. which is why i don't outline and box myself into -- that doesn't work for everybody. it really works for me though. >> the bane of my existence is the internet. next thing you know, i'm at a website looking at an auction of a 1956 chevrolet today or something. >> that's the problem today. >> the internet is what whiskey used to be for writers now a days. >> there you go. the book is "and the mountains echoed." khalid hosseini, thank you so much. fantastic to have you on the show. >> thank you, guys.
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board games, they're making a comeback but in shorter versions. games like scrabble and boggle and monopoly are releasing shorter versions of the game because companies say kids don't have enough time or attention span anymore. >> it's about time. no, it's true. kids today have tight schedules. but how do toymakers cut down all the time kids waste enjoying themselves? the new monopoly empire game lets players buy big-name brands like coke and mcdonald's. games are as quick as 30 minutes. to speed things up, there's no more go to jail. >> that's right, no jail. so it's faster and it teaches
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kids what it's really like to work on wall street. >> all right. 48 past the hour. a major milestone in unemployment. >> the unploipt situation continues to get better and the markets are responding positively. here's the situation. 326,000 unemployment claims for the week. that was below expectations. i always say focus on the four-week average because that's more of a trend. that is also down. in fact, with china news and european news which is better than expected and guess what, we've got a higher open on our hands in the market. in fact, the dow is up about 19% now so far this year. the s&p 500 has only dropped five days in the month of july. so the stock market continues to chug right on. one stock that will not chug, jcpenney, stock fell after hours. reports one of their lenders may have cut off lending to smaller manufacturers because of concerns about the company's credit. >> steve, facebook had a good
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day. they're back. >> above the offering price. >> just what i said. >> that was your prediction. >> is facebook figuring out how to handle the mobile challenge? >> they got their mobile advertising to work in this quarter. i don't think facebook's going out of business but that stock is pretty pricey. >> agree with that, brian? >> listen, facebook is sort of -- facebook has got a challenge. the click through rate on the ads is about, what, one tenth of 1%? you can see an ad on your mobile phone but how many of us have clicked it while sober? you sort of got the drunken mouse click where you scroll over something for a little bit too long. i just wander how effective they're going to be in the long run. >> i don't want to hear about your personal life. >> i do. what's the last mobile ad? >> drunk clicking. just stop. >> i only use the cnbc app. it's the only app i've got on my
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phone. >> oh, it's one of those. great. brian sullivan, thank you so much. hey, keep it right here on "morning joe." we will be right back. thanks td resilience and determination of the american people, we've been able to clear away the rubble from the financial crisis. we started to lay a new foundation for stronger, more durable economic growth. but we're not there yet. what we need is not a 3-month plan or even a 3-year plan. we need a long-term american strategy: job security with good wages and durable industries. a good education. reducing poverty. reducing inequality. growing opportunity. i'm going to keep pushing to make high-quality preschool
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available for every four-year-old in america it's time for the minimum wage to go up. (cheers) but i won't be able to do it alone, so i'm going to be calling... on all of us to take up this cause. good jobs; a better bargain for the middle class... and the folks who are working to get into the middle class; an economy that grows from the middle-out. that's what we need. (cheers) i'to guard their manhood with trnew depend shields and guards. the discreet protection that's just for guys. now, it's your turn. get my training tips at guardyourmanhood.com
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for the first time in more than a month, edward snowed be has left the moscow airport after russia granted him a years worth of asylum. the u.s. is demanding snowden be returned home to face prosecution for leaking classified documents about america's surveillance programs. and of course they were even saying they would be treated in a certain way and russia has responded. byasylum. >> it shows vladimir putin being absolutely obsessed with the united states of america -- >> there's a gesture i would liken this to. >> driven by resentment. at some point, the united states needs to respond. and let putin know if he wants to play resentful former kgb agent, do it. >> what do we do? >> well, we have reaction to the new developments surrounding the snowden case from the former cia and nsa director, general
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michael hayden. on set tomorrow. up next what did you learn today? written by people just like you. no company can pay to be on angie's list, so you can trust what you're reading. angie's list is like having thousands of close neighbors, where i can go ask for personal recommendations. that's the idea. before you have any work done, check angie's list. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. i love you, angie. sorry, honey. imagine what it's doing to your pores. [ female announcer ] neutrogena® oil free moisture hydrates without clogging pores. 100% free of oil, fragrance and dyes. oil free. worry free. [ female announcer ] oil free moisture. neutrogena®.
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bjorn earns unlimited rewards for his small business. take these bags to room 12 please. [ garth ] bjorn's small business earns double miles on every purchase every day. produce delivery. [ bjorn ] just put it on my spark card. [ garth ] why settle for less? ahh, oh! [ garth ] great businesses deserve unlimited rewards. here's your wake up call. [ male announcer ] get the spark business card from capital one and earn unlimited rewards. choose double miles or 2% cash back on every purchase every day. what's in your wallet? [ crows ] now where's the snooze button? welcome back, kids. it's time to talk about what we learned today. "time" magazine's talking about, you know, no kids and how people are without kids. everybody, you know, different strokes for different folks. i got to say, it's hard work, but there is nothing, absolutely nothing, that replaces being a
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father. or a mother. >> it's the most wonderful thing. >> it's the hardest job you can have and it's the best job. i learn when i say to people we have seven children, they look at me as if i just said i have six heads. >> i learned something different. i learned something from joe i never heard him say before which is we need more leadership from the white house. can you believe it? >> i will say the white house, it is hampered because there aren't earmarks anymore. so they don't have the ability to sort of go without. >> i learned it is time to wrap it up and we're over again because somebody goes on for a long time, talks a lot. if it's way too early, what time is it? >> time for "morning joe." right now, right now, it's time for chuck todd. chuck here? >> he's here, he's back. >> take it away. >> oh, chuck. >> so much earlier. i love